THE INTERNET PUBLIC LIBRARY EXHIBIT HALL DEBUTS LIGHTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

David S. Carter
School of Information
University of Michigan
550 East University
Ann Arbor, MI
48109-1092
ipl@ipl.org

July 31, 1996

ANN ARBOR, MI., JULY 31, 1996--The Internet Public Library (IPL), a project based at the University of Michigan School of Information, recently debuted Lighthouses: A Photographic Journey, a photography exhibition based on the travels of Don and Diana Carter. This exhibition is available via the IPL's site on the World-Wide Web at http://www.ipl.org/exhibit/light

Over 200 lighthouses from the coasts of the Great Lakes, the southern U.S. Atlantic, and Ireland are featured. Each lighthouse has its own 'page,' containing a photograph of the light and a brief description. Visitors to the exhibition can search for their favorite lighthouse, browse by name or location, or read the travel journals to experience the lighthouses along with Don and Diana's own journeys.

Since 1987, Don and Diana Carter, residents of White Lake Township, Michigan, have traveled around the world visiting and photographing lighthouses. On the occasion of the opening of the exhibition based on their work, Don said, "It's exciting to share our love of lighthouses with so many different people who will be exploring the IPL."

Lighthouses: A Photographic Journey will be the featured exhibition in the IPL Exhibit Hall (http://www.ipl.org/exhibit/) during the months of July and August. Past exhibitions, still available in the Exhibit Hall, have included: Anarchist Images; Music History 101: A Basic Guide to Western Composers and Their Music; The Art of the Fake: Egyptian Forgeries from the Kelsey Museum of Archeology; Trains Across America; and the Museum of African American History in Detroit. Future exhibitions planned for the coming months include Genesis, a look at historical photographic portraits of African-Americans; and Grammy Mirk, a unique look at family history.

The Internet Public Library is a project based at the University of Michigan School of Information, partially supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The library began as a graduate student project in 1995, and is now staffed by professional librarians with assistance from students and volunteer librarians from around the World. The library maintains a collection of network-based ready reference works; responds to reference queries, creates resources for children and young adults; evaluates and categorizes resources on the Internet, and provides a space for exhibitions. The library strives to be a source of innovation in the networked environment, seeking partnerships with organizations with compatible goals.