Swinging Through Time: The Graysone Museum and the Story of Detroit Jazz Exhibit Debuts on the IPL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Bryan A. Blank
W. Kim Heron
Internet Public Library
University of Michigan
4029 SEB
610 E. University
Ann Arbor, MI
48109-1092
exhibits@ipl.org

April 11, 1997

ANN ARBOR, MI., April 11, 1997--The Internet Public Library (IPL), a project based at the University of Michigan School of Information, announces the debut of a new multimedia exhibit: "Swinging Through Time: The Graystone Museum and the Story of Detroit Jazz." (http://www.ipl.org/exhibit/detjazz/)

Mention Detroit and music and more often than not you can expect Motown to be the answer. But that's just the most commercially successful manifestation of Motor City music. Before Motown -- and since Motown, too -- Detroit has been a city of jazz, a point made on-line in image, text, sound and video in "Swinging Through Time: The Graystone Museum and the Story of Detroit Jazz."

The Graystone International Jazz Museum and Hall of Fame was begun more than 20 years ago to preserve the legacy of Detroit jazz and the famed '20s ballroom for which the museum is named. The museum has allowed a sampling of materials from its archives to go on line, and exhibit producers Bryan Blank and W. Kim Heron have made that material the centerpiece of their presentation. You can see bands and the ballroom, publicity shots and artifacts spanning decades of jazz, and a slide show of shots from the famed bebop hangout, the Blue Bird.

That's not all. The "Swinging Through Time Reading Room" makes available otherwise unavailable essays on the history of jazz in Detroit --from jazz's precursors in the 19th Century to its latest manifestations in Detroit. In the "Listening Room," use Real Audio to hear a half-dozen bands ranging from bop to avant fusion; from the "Video Lounge" you can download clips of "drummist" Roy Brooks playing one of the meanest saws -- no kidding -- in all of jazz.

The Internet Public Library is a project based at the University of Michigan School of Information, partially supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The library began as a graduate student project in 1995, and is now staffed by professional librarians with assistance from students and volunteer librarians from around the World. The library maintains a collection of network-based ready reference works; responds to reference queries, creates resources for children and young adults; evaluates and categorizes resources on the Internet, and provides a space for exhibitions. The library strives to be a source of innovation in the networked environment, seeking partnerships with organizations with compatible goals.