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American: 1783-1865

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Sites about American: 1783-1865 literature:

American Transcendentalism Web
http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/
An "interlinked hypertext was first created in Spring 1999 by Virginia Commonwealth University graduate students studying in Professor Ann Woodlief's class in Studies in American Transcendentalism."
Contains: Historical Context,
Author: Woodlief, Ann
From: Virginia Commonwealth University
Keywords:
Access Restrictions:
 
The American Female Poets, With Biographical and Critical Notices
http://www.hti.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=amverse;idno=BAE7433.0001.001
Contains selected poems of assorted American women poets, with short biographical sketches and critical notes.
From: Humanities Text Initiative Philadelphia, Penn: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1853
Keywords: Women, Poetry, Poets
 
The American Novel
http://www.bartleby.com/187/
"This historical treatment of the development of the “Great American Novel” expands upon Van Doren’s chapters on fiction in the Cambridge History of American Literature."
Contains: Historical Context
Author: Van Doren, Carl
From: Macmillan 1921
Keywords:
 
American Spirit in Literature: A Chronicle of Great Interpreters
http://digital.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=3410
"Certain expressions of American sentiment or conviction have served to summarize or to clarify the spirit of the nation. The authors of these productions have frequently won the recognition and affection of their contemporaries by means of prose and verse quite unsuited to sustain the test of severe critical standards. Neither Longfellow's 'Excelsior' nor Poe's 'Bells' nor Whittier's 'Maud Muller' is among the best poems of the three writers in question, yet there was something in each of these productions which caught the fancy of a whole American generation. It expressed one phase of the national mind in a given historical period."
Contains: Historical Context
Author: Bliss Perry
From: New Haven, Yale University Press 1918
Keywords:
 
Distrust of the Reader in Afro-American Narratives
http://books.iuniverse.com/viewbooks.asp?isbn=1583484167&page=300
"I will argue here... that Afro-American literature has developed as much because of the culture's distrust of literacy as because of its abiding faith in it."
Contains: Historical Context
Author: Robert B. Stepto
From: Reconstructing American Literary History Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1986. p.300
Keywords:
 
Early Humorists
http://www.bartleby.com/226/index.html#10
This lengthy analysis of early American humourists includes sections on "Two Forms of American Humour: Classical and Native", "Colonial Humorists", "Baldwin: The Flush Times of Alabama and Mississippi", "Shaw: Josh Billings", and "Browne: Artemus Ward."
Contains: Historical Context, Content Analysis, Bibliography
Author: Will D. Howe
From: The Cambridge History of English and American Literature Volume XVI: American, Early National Literature: Part II, Later National Literature: Part II
Keywords:
 
"Of Plymouth Rock and Jamestown and Ellis Island"; or, Ethnic Literature and Some Redefinitions of "America"
http://www.nyupress.org/americansall/americansall3.html?$string
"In Crèvecoeur's famous answer to the question "What is an American?" in the third of his Letters from an American Farmer (1782) he singled out "that strange mixture of blood, which you will find in no other country" (Crèvecoeur 1957, 39). For Crèvecoeur {right}, the term "American" referred to the ethnic diversity of at least the white colonists in the New World. Initially applied to the Indians, then taken on by the British settlers, by 1900 the term "American" had undoubtedly become problematic."
Contains: Historical Context
Author: Werner Sollors
Keywords:
 
An Other Voice: Ventriloquism in the Romantic Period
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~scat0385/hodgson.html
"Ventriloquism as the voice of an absence: we must begin by abandoning our own twentieth-century preconceptions and recovering those of an earlier era. Charlie McCarthy is a badly misleading guide to the practices of his predecessors. Before 1800, ventriloquism almost exclusively implied not a transferred but a disembodied voice -- the voice putatively of a spirit, of a ghost, of God, or (once ventriloquism became a popular entertainment) of the performer's hidden or invisible companion. The ventriloquist's is always an other's voice; but the history of ventriloquism during the early Romantic period (ca. 1801-1820) is, like many other Romantic histories, a history of the gradual appearance and embodiment of the other."
Contains: Historical Context
Author: John A. Hodgson
From: Romanticism on the Net Vol 16 November 1999
Keywords:
 
Poets of the Civil War I: The North
http://www.bartleby.com/226/index.html#17
This lengthy analysis of American poets of the Civil War includes sections on "The Mood of the North", "Effect upon the Poets", "Melville; Halpine", "The War in the West; Willson", "Songs of the Soldiers", and "Lincoln."
Contains: Historical Context, Content Analysis, Bibliography
Author: Will D. Howe
From: The Cambridge History of English and American Literature Volume XVI: American, Early National Literature: Part II, Later National Literature: Part II
Keywords:
 
Poets of the Civil War I: The South
http://www.bartleby.com/226/index.html#18
This lengthy analysis of American poets of the Civil War includes sections on "Southern Poetry before the War ", "Soldier Poets", "Randall: My Maryland", "Davidson; Living Writers of the South", and "The Poets after the War."
Contains: Historical Context, Content Analysis, Bibliography
Author: Edwin Mims
From: The Cambridge History of English and American Literature Volume XVI: American, Early National Literature: Part II, Later National Literature: Part II
Keywords:
 
Romantic Cyborgs: Technology, Authorship, and the Politics of Reproduction in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
http://node9.phil3.uni-freiburg.de/1997/Benesch2.html
Author: Klaus Benesch
From: Node9 Volume 1, 1997
Keywords:
 

Authors in American: 1783-1865 literature:

Charles Brockden Brown (1771 - 1810)William Wells Brown (1815 - 1884)
William Cullen Bryant (1794 - 1878)Alice Cary (1820 - 1871)
James Fenimore Cooper (1789 - 1851)Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)Hannah Webster Foster (1758 - 1840)
Margaret Fuller (1810 - 1850)Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)
Caroline Lee Hentz (1800 - 1856)Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)
Washington Irving (1783 - 1859)Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)
Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)
Susanna Rowson (1762 - 1824)Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789 - 1867)
William Gilmore Simms (1806 - 1870)Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811 - 1896)
Elizabeth Stoddard (1823 - 1902)Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)
John Trumbull (1750 - 1831)Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)
Susan Warner (1819 - 1885)Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)


Last Updated Mar 25, 2014