1789-1860 Political Parties

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“However [political parties] … are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government…”, wrote George Washington, the father of the United States and the first American president, during his farewell address. Washington forewarned that the creation of a one-party political system would be the death of the American democracy. That is why a two-party system, and political parties in general, have been an integral part of the American democracy for over two centuries. Between 1789 and 1860, the existence of political parties, whether it was the Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Whigs, or Democratic Republicans, had a profound affect on the development of the American economy, government, and social framework. The existence of political parties affected the development of the American economy, as evidenced by when America enacted the Tariff of 1789 which was championed by Federalists such as Alexander Hamilton, and vilified by Anti-Federalists, such as Thomas Jefferson. The Tariff of 1879 was meant to provide a source of revenue for the federal government, so it could pay the debts incurred by the states and the national government during the…show more content…
All in all, between the years of 1789 and 1860, the existence of political parties has deeply affected the development of the American economy, government, and social framework. The American political system has seen the rise and fall of numerous political parties who had a multitude of stances on different issues. Just as George Washington said, a one-party political system is not a true democracy. That is why the American political system has been one of the most successful, as their are often two primary political parties that will not allow the country to lean too far in one direction on the political spectrum, thus balancing and counteracting one
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