George Orwell 1984 Non Traditional Analysis

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1984 by George Orwell is nontraditional. The exposition in this story is notably interesting. At times when I'm reading a new story with a societal structure vastly different than my own, the author tends to provide far more information than necessary; my eyes have a tendency to glaze over the text rather than actively and fascinatedly reading. The concepts in 1984 are explained thoroughly and cleverly; seldom did I feel I was simply reading pages of exposition without a purpose. This is due, in part, to the compelling and fascinating subject matter. Orwell has masterfully created a world with its own morals, laws, values, environment and personality - while still being a plausible outcome of Earthly society. This novel isn’t categorized as…show more content…
For example, one of Winston’s major struggles is his lack of a mentor. For a large portion of the novel, Winston feels as if he is the only person he knows with a self-admitted loathing towards The Party. Winston questioned if he was a lunatic, concluding that “Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one” (Orwell 68). When he encounters others with his fringe beliefs, he assumes he is experiencing intense paranoia or delusion. This causes a lot of internal conflict within Winston; he feels that he is psychotically out-of-place in a world of rigid order and subordinance. When he finds Julia, she becomes more of an ally than a mentor. If Goldstein had been further developed as a character, or perhaps if his existence would have been confirmed, he could have potentially mentored Winston. The Party was most likely aware of this, which is why they kept all of his whereabouts vague. The main anomaly in 1984’s role as both a Hero's Journey novel and a fiction book is that the Elixir of the Shadow is met rather than the Hero’s Elixir. The Party's ultimate goal is total and complete conformity, implemented through Telescreens, Newspeak, the Thought Police, the two minutes of Hate, and the severe ramifications of Thought Crime. Winston is eventually brainwashed after days, weeks, and months of physical and psychological torture to accept and adore Big…show more content…
Reading it in his Freshman year English class, he thought this is book was really interesting, but utterly unrealistic. Scientists deduced the technology used in the book could be created; he believed that the mindset could never. After thinking about about Nazism and the propaganda, fascism, dictatorship, fear-mongering exercised within, he understood that the mindset within human reach. To ease his worries, he concluded that our country would two would never the intersect. After all, this book was written to let people know what happens when they do! Sitting in front of me on our ivory upholstered couch, his eyes well with tears as he acknowledges the story’s terrifyingly eerie relevance, and what that means for
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