2.2 Family Factors Analysis

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2.2 Family factors The family is the first agent of socialization for any person. It is where we learn right from wrong. We learn basic behavior such as table manners and how to treat other people. Our immediate and extended family plays an important role in shaping our personality and character. That means therefore that we can also learn bad behavior such as delinquency from our family members just as we learn good behavior. According to Graham and Bowling (as cited in Cheseto, 2012) family factors which may have an influence on offending include; the level of parenting, the way parents discipline a child, parental conflict or separation, criminal parents or siblings, parental abuse or neglect and the quality of parent-child relationship.…show more content…
While studying the impact of parenting styles ion acquisition of deviant behavior among children aged 8-18 years in western Kenya, Malayi et al, (2013) argued that parenting style has a significant impact on the behavior of a child. He found that children whose parents sued democratic type of parenting were less likely to be delinquents since the children get a chance to make choices and can discuss issues with their parents. Parents who used authoritarian type of parenting were found to be more likely to raise children with deviant behavior. This is due to the tendency of the parent to be aggressive and arrogant towards the child. A combination of the aspects of these parenting styles seems to be appropriate. The impact of parental abuse and neglect as a contributing factor to the behavior cannot be over emphasized. According to the children’s department in Kenya, neglect is the leading form of child abuse in the country. This is a push factor for many children who engage in petty theft and other types of crimes. For example, in 2012, a child was taken to the Children’s department in Malindi for stealing ugali (maize meal). On being questioned what made him do it, he replied that he committed the offence out of hunger. He said that his parents were drunkards who did not care whether or not he had his everyday…show more content…
Witnessing domestic violence has been linked to increased child behavior problems, especially for boys and younger children (Reid and Crisafulli, 1990). Little is known about the age range in which children may be most vulnerable or how long associations persist. In most families, when the woman is battered, children are also battered (McKibben, De Vos, and New-berger, 1989). The co-occurrence of child abuse and witnessing domestic violence affects children’s adjustment more than twice as much as witnessing domestic violence alone (Hughes, Parkinson, and Vargo, 1989). Other factors that impose additional risk in violent families include a high incidence of other behavior problems (e.g., alcohol abuse and incarceration) in male batterers. Maternal psychological distress may also expose children to additional indirect risks, such as the mother being emotionally unavailable to the children (Zuckerman et al.,
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