A Comparison Of A Midsummer Night's Dream And Richard II

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In Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tragedy of King Richard the Second, and Othello, the Moor of Venice there are several similarities, at least among any two of them simultaneously. A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Othello share conquered, forbidden and/or lost love. Othello and Richard II share envy of power and tragedies. A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Richard II share a defiance of family and tragedies. The various story similarities range from one extreme to the other, however similar they are. Take for instance, Othello has tested tragic love and A Midsummer Night’s Dream has forbidden yet conquered love. Whereas, The Tragedy of King Richard the Second is a serious play of sorts, without twisted love stories. Shakespeare was actually…show more content…
Egeus had chosen Demetrius for her. Hermia was defiant of her father and followed her dream of love to the man she truly loved, Lysander. It is here, the play shows it relationship to Richard II in its defiance of family as well as its similarities to Othello where Desdemona married Othello. She did this behind the back of her father Senator Brabantio & the young gentlemen suitor, Roderigo.
Here, Iago and Roderigo tell Brabantio, after waking him as if he is being robbed in the night, of his daughter marriage.
Then to see another similarity would be to look into the envy of power and tragedies within, Othello and Richard II. Iago thinks, Othello granted Cassio a lieutenant position he deserved and he feels both betray him with his wife. He sits out for revenge of all with his jealous envy and ultimately ends the play in multiple tragic deaths.
With this Iago has convenience Othello of the fake affair, thus sealing the faith of the innocent Desdemona. He had convenience Roderigo of the same from the beginning sealing his faith as well when it was meant to be Cassio. In the end, Othello learning the truth, Iago wins again even to his damnation when Othello takes his own

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