A Rhetorical Analysis Of Atlanta Compromise By Booker T. Washington

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Booker T. Washington is a historically great African-American spokesman. Being the leader of a lesser treated race, Washington not only has proved himself throughout history as a fantastic speaker and motivator, but also as an educated man who deserves the respect of all men, regardless of their race. He is most famous for his prominent teachings of the African American race, and how they can better themselves. In his speech “Atlanta Compromise”, Washington brings to the forefront of southern business men, as well as some northerners, that for the African-American race to truly prosper that they not only need to make amends with whites and get industrial jobs, but to also receive the same overall freedom that the white south had. The audience, …show more content…

He begins his speech by explaining the amplitude of African Americans in the south. Washington quotes “One-third of the population of the South is of Negro race. No enterprise seeking the material, civil, or moral welfare of this section can disregard the element of our population and reach the highest success”. This goes to show the amount of power they hold, but are not recognized by. He appeals to the audience by logos as the sheer amount of people should be persuasive enough to convince them that something must be done. He says that no one can avoid mentioning them should that person wish to come to power, which also appeals to the audience’s sense of logic. Washington’s main point in the speech is conveyed in that recognition of the African-American race would be a “cementing” point in black/white …show more content…

Washington puts it as “The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than the opportunity to spend a dollar in an opera-house”. He appeals to the audience's sense of emotion somewhat here, as he shows that the average African-American can earn their money, but they are not allowed by the harsh society to use it at free will. This also connects with the previously stated sense of character and logic, as the good African Americans will do responsible things with the money, which could improve the American economy. Washington believed it was more important to be able to use the dollar, rather than just having

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