A Sin To Kill A Mocking Bird Analysis

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In the novel of To Kill a Mockingbird, there are many references and symbols that reflect the concept of innocence. In this book, Harper Lee uses a snowman, a mockingbird, and Boo Radley to represent innocence in an attempt to portray the fact that innocence can be corrupted and mistaken as corrupted. Harper Lee uses the concept of killing a mockingbird as a way to symbolize innocence. Innocence can be easily corrupted by society’s view of certain issues, as shown in this book. Harper Lee states, “Atticus said to Jem one day, ‘I’d rather you shoot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird’” (Lee 119). Atticus says that killing a mockingbird is a sin. It is a sin because a mockingbird is innocent. Miss Maudie says, “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to…show more content…
Boo Radley was a mockingbird because he was innocent. Boo Radley is one of the key symbols to represent the concept of innocence, other than the mockingbird itself. Boo Radley was a man of innocence mistaken for corruption. The whole beauty of his pure motives was taken away by the people of the town and the children. Rumors were spread and he was said to be a man that he was not. Even the things he did wrong, he did them for all the right reasons. For example, in chapter 28, he killed Bob Ewell in an attempt to save Jem and Scout. Scout began to understand his innocence towards the very end of the book when she realized how wrong she was for thinking him to be such an evil and scary figure when really, he
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