A Summary Of Richard Duncan's War

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Young Henry Castleman woke before dawn, dressed and dawned his drum. As the 13 year old assistant drummer, he was required to assemble for the morning reveille, with Robert Averil, the 18 year old drummer and the fifers. A few tents over Francis Ullman would have heard the drumming and movement as he had done for the past 4 years. He got up, dressed in his Johnson’s Greens, grabbed his rifle and joined his fellow privates of Company 8, Captain Richard Duncan’s crew of 50 men and boys. The July day was a routine one, for by 1782, the American War of Independence was pretty much over in the state of New York and the fighting that was still going on was far to the south in South Carolina. Besides, any fighting to be done was the problem of the…show more content…
O Canada With disbandment of the regiment, labelled as a rebel, and the shock of having your land signed off by your government in the Treaty of Paris, nearly all the King’s fighting men headed for the Canadas which afforded protections and British guarantees of a future life. It also gave the British territory some much needed defence with the battle hardened men just in case the Americans were to expand further north. Francis, Catherine and his family of 7 (including Thomas’s father-to-be Phillip), along with the whole of Duncan’s Company and their families were placed in the District of Luneburg and more specifically were encamped near the shores of the St. Lawrence River about 40 kms west of present day Cornwall. A few of the company headed back to New York within a few years, as for some, it was not so dangerous. By far most chose to stay, for the loyalty ran deep, and the British government would be generous to her…show more content…
Francis obtained his first 100 acres of land through petition in February 1789 on the eastern edge of Williamsburg Township (Lot 3 Con. 3). His brother Henry got his grant not far away (Lot 24, Con. 4). Later Francis made more requests for land as in 1797 for Lot 11 Con. 5 and Lot 31 Con. 6, again in Williamsburg Township. Even as late as 1807 he was petitioning for more land: To His Excellency Francis Gore Esquire – Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Upper Canada - &c &c &c In council, The petition of Francis Uleman of The Township of Williamsbourgh [sic], Humbly Shewtts, That our Petitioner was born in the State of New York and Joined the Royal Standard in /1777/ and Served as a private Soldier in the first Batillon [sic] of K.R.R.N.York and – then he was discharged / 1783/ Settled in this province in /1784/ and have ever Since resided therein. Where fore your Petitioner may that his name may lie in Stated on the the [sic] ul list. The anaxed [sic] certificate, will certify the Statement in the petition – Henry and Elizabeth Froats Thomas ' Aunt c 1849 Johnson - www.ancestry.com York in the province of Upper
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