Abraham Lincoln's Views On Slavery

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Abraham Lincoln 's views on slavery stimulated from things that he had saw growing up during his childhood. When Lincoln was younger slavery was extremely well known, in some ways it was a normal way of life. Still, Lincoln had his own personal feelings towards African Americans which in some ways remained constant and neutral for most of the time. However, his views on slavery began to change as different things in nation started to change; such as social, political, and economic issues. Lincoln initially recognized that slavery was a bad idea but, it was one that was accepted throughout the nation. He also at the time seemed to support the belief that blacks did not deserve equal treatment of whites. This view probably also came from his family 's background and the way that he was taught to view the…show more content…
After the 1860 election, Lincoln made a firm public decision not to accept the expansion of slavery into the territories. In other words, Lincoln 's early position as president was that, slavery could remain in current slave states but could not expand to new states or territories. Although, Lincoln’s views on slavery often shifted some of them seemed to contradict one another. On another note, current slave states could vouch to keep things the way that they are but, Lincoln still felt that if a nation was divided it would be almost impossible to survive. Lincoln 's views at this time were politically motivated, and they focused on ending the war and preserving the Union. He felt that Southerners shouldn’t be allowed to split the nation or to further beliefs that did not support human freedom and equality for all citizens. Lincoln carried on war for four years in support of the position that the issue of slavery shouldn’t be allowed to end the Union. In January 1863 Lincoln formed his final position on slavery when he signed the Emancipation Proclamation which declared, "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be

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