Abraham Maslow's Behavioral Theory

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Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs behavioral theory (Maslow, 1943), of which motivation is a part, and its relationship with volunteer performance is the fundamental focus of this research. Motivation is the art of helping people to focus their minds and energies on doing their work as effectively as possible. Maslow’s behavioral theory, specifically his Hierarchy of Human Needs, was chosen primarily because there are different levels of motivation as well as different levels o f team performance. Maslow adds that under all but exceptional circumstances, an individual strives to satisfy a predictable sequence of needs, beginning with efforts to fulfill physiological needs, followed by effort to fulfill safety, social, ego, and self-realization…show more content…
The theorist of most concern in this study is Abraham Maslow. He is the father of the human potential movement who developed a validated hierarchy of human needs theory (Maslow, 1943). Validation of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs behavioral theory is critical for previous research because it builds on what has been proven or already established. His Hierarchy of Human Needs theory was chosen because there are different levels of motivation as well as different levels of team performance. Maslow states that there are at least five sets of goals, which may be called basic needs. These are briefly physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-…show more content…
Volunteerism is unpaid people to help provided in an organized manner to parties to whom the worker has no obligations (Musick and Wilson (1997). Volunteers are also more likely than paid workers to be given the opportunity to learn skills on the job, and this may affect performance ratings. There are many differences between the domains of paid and volunteer work, including a lack of pay and dependence on the organization for subsistence. However, whereas the motives for volunteering may be different than the motives for employment in a paying job, the tasks and situations these individuals face in their volunteer work can often be similar to the tasks and situations individuals face in paid work (Wilson & Musick, 1997). For many individuals, these activities are akin to a career, and they can come to identify with the goals and be committed to the values of those organizations (Jaime B. Henning,
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