Abraham Maslow's Theory Of Motivation And Organizational Behavior

1852 Words8 Pages
Motivation is an innate driving force embodied in each of us, and is of great importance in the modern workplace mainly due to its practical implications, such as productivity and la-bour turnover. Several theories have emerged attempting to explain the topic of motivation. The theories that I have chosen are the content theory devised by Abraham Maslow, known as the ‘Maslow Theory of Hierarchy’ and the process theory known as the ‘Equity theory’, proposed by J. Stacy Adams. Earlier theories of motivation were often designed to be big theories of human nature, whereas later theories have tended to confine themselves to spe-cific aspects of motivated behaviour. Per the book Organizational Behaviour (Buachanan and Huczynski 2010) motivation is…show more content…
The downfall of the theory is that it cannot predict which strategy an individual will pick. Picking a certain strategy, such as altering the comparison person’s outcomes may make short term sense, but can lead to long term consequences for your workplace relationships and your employment at the…show more content…
Also, having a promotional system whereby after a series of results or years worked at the firm employees move up to manager or partner in corporate firms, rather than hand picking promotions that may lead to a feeling of inequity. The list of differences between Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and Adams’ Equity Theory can be easily summarised. Content theories deal with ‘Why do people work?’ while process theories deal with ‘What factors influence how hard people work?’. Also, Maslow’s theory does not allow for individual or cultural motivations, and his needs are described as univer-salist, whereas Adams’ theory allows for individual and cultural motivations, while also al-lowing for our ability to make choices based on our motivations. Accounts of motivation have limited value in understanding and managing work behaviour. They offer very interesting reads into the way of human motivation, but lack solid theoreti-cal findings and give vague instructions to managers on ways to motivate
Open Document