Abuse In Disney's Cinderella

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Disney’s Cinderella is the quintessential princess fairytale. It has a beautiful girl in distress, an evil stepmother, talking animals, and an abundance of singing. Cinderella herself is a figure deeply embedded into popular culture, and most will cite Disney as the parent of the story’s popularity. The story centers around the timelessly beautiful Cinderella; a young woman who has lost her father, and thus is required to live with her evil stepmother and stepsisters who treat her as the help. Despite her step-relatives’ abuse, Cinderella remains kind and gentle, and befriends the estate’s many animals. Meanwhile, in the castle nearly, the King organizes a kingdom-wide ball to help his son find a wife. Cinderella is told by her stepmother…show more content…
Head of the house, Lady Tremaine, has sharp, aggressive facial features. She possesses an angular face which is perfectly paired with her monster-like, evil green eyes. Maniacal and wicked, Lady Tremaine is the orchestrator of Cinderella’s abuse. Unlike their mother, stepsisters Drizella and Anastasia did not inherit their mother’s intimidating beauty. The stepsisters have a goofy look with enormous mouths and slouched posture. They are obnoxiously greedy characters, and mirror the grace of a newborn…show more content…
Cinderella is stuck doing housework until she decides that she must attend a handsome prince’s ball. Before the invitation arrives at her doorstep, she had not thought of breaking out of the house. To further show this underlying message, the prince is responsible for Cinderella’s escape to freedom; he is her hero. He receives the prestigious title of savior, even though his character only has a handful of speaking lines. This message could be harmful to young girls because Cinderella does not teach her viewers to be headstrong. Instead, Cinderella teaches the message that girls can rely on a man to save them, minimizing the value of independence and
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