Academic Integrity In Higher Education

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A decade of enormous growth and innovation in the field of online learning has had significant impact upon Higher Education by highlighting the issues of Academic Integrity. The Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) defines academic integrity as “a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to five fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. From these values flow principles of behavior that enable academic communities to translate ideals to action.” (REF) The growth of online learning in higher education has created unique challenges in maintaining academic integrity (Rowe, 2004). Although academic integrity is an issue in general, but different researcher (REF) have realized the problem of ensuring academic integrity…show more content…
Accessibility and convenience through these learning resources may have also created new opportunities for academic dishonesty. For example, (REF) research shows that in 1999, only 10% of students had plagiarized by copying and pasting from the Internet; by 2005, that number had increased to 41%. Although the research for comparing online cheating to face-to-face classroom cheating is limited, studies have shown that the frequency of academic dishonesty may be the same or slightly higher in online classes, depending upon the act (REF)While some studies indicate that there may not be a quantitative difference between online cheating and cheating in face-to-face classes ((REF)), the evidence is that students are cheating in online courses, whether at the same frequency as face-to-face instruction or slightly…show more content…
For example, a critical concern regarding online learning is the challenge of verifying that the student who is enrolled in the online course is, indeed, the student who is submitting the work. Online students have the ability to share materials and tests by networking with one another, even if they are not attending the same college or in the same class (REF). Other studies have also indicated that collaboration for exams is more prevalent in online classes (REF). Consequently, in addition to preventing the problem of students from engaging in unethical behavior such as faking one’s identity to submit another student’s work, online faculty are also expected to be responsible for preventing other acts of academic dishonesty in their courses (REF). With online course design and policies that strategically address the problem of academic integrity (REF). and, as research indicates, students’ increased moral reasoning through ethics embedded in instruction (REF), faculty have the ability to address the
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