Academic Self-Esteem

956 Words4 Pages
According to Afari (2012), The relationship between positive and negative self-esteem and academic self-efficacy explored by means of a confirmatory factor analysis initially revealed an acceptable fit. The model was later adjusted on the basis of modification indices and this resulted in a good fit. The positive self-esteem correlated very strongly with the negative self-esteem, and also the positive self-esteem and the academic self-efficacy was slightly strongly correlated. The results indicate that positive self-esteem significantly predicted student’ academic self-efficacy. But the negative self-esteem and the academic self-efficacy was weakly correlated and was not statistically significant. Past research has indicated that self-esteem…show more content…
Some researchers investigated the relationship between self -esteem and academic achievement and found that high self-esteem facilitates academic achievement. Only a limited correlation was revealed between self-esteem and academic achievement(Pullmann & Allik, 2008). Several recent studies have attempted to investigate the direct relationship between self –esteem and academic achievement. According to the studies (Pullmann & Allik, 2008) low general self- esteem does not necessarily signal a poor academic achievement. Their result shows that low (not high) general self-esteem is a significant predictor of superior school performance. However, research finding from (Marsh & O’Mara, 2008) suggested that prior self-esteem has small positive effect on subsequent educational…show more content…
This is one example of body-shaming, and it is everywhere. Sitcoms so frequently use overweight characters’ bodies as the basis of many of the show’s jokes. It has become the norm to criticize aspects of our bodies as some type of bonding experience with friends – if we all hate our bodies; it somehow makes us feel connected and united. Body-shaming (criticizing yourself or others because of some aspect of physical appearance) can lead to a vicious cycle of judgment and criticism. Messages from the media and from each other often imply that we should want to change, that we should care about looking slimmer, smaller, and tanner. And if we don’t, we worry that we are at risk of being the target of someone else’s body-shaming
Open Document