Advantages And Disadvantages Of The Articles Of Confederation

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The first constitution of the unites states that was ever written was called the Articles of Confederation drafted by congress on 1777. The Articles of Confederation were created to balance the need for national coordination of the war of independence. The articles made sure that each state no matter how big or populated it was only casted one vote to make it fair for everyone. The only power the articles gave the government was regarding its independence, this included declaring war, conducting foreign affairs, as well as making treaties with other governments. The main advantage of the Articles of Confederation was that it aided to maintain the independence and sovereignty of each state. The Articles of Confederation gave states the opportunity…show more content…
Although the central government was purposefully given a limited amount of power, but delegates did not realize that this would make it that much more difficult to handle problems involving economics, trade disputes, along with other states individual states would have because of the amount of independence they had. Even though the Articles of Confederation gave the United States the power to negotiate international treaties, they did not have a centralized authority which meant any international government could not negotiate with the United States. This made the US miss out on a lot of available trade opportunities that were open to them and could have benefitted them and their economy. The lack of regulations and laws led to high levels of inflation which led to the states having very little economic…show more content…
One of the biggest issues when discussing The Constitution was slavery. Almost half of the delegates owned slaves at the time of this which made it that much harder to discuss the issue of regulating slavery under the Constitution. The south threatened to leave; not join the union if slavery was abolished. This was the primary reason why it was not addressed in the
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