In Vitro Fertilization

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In vitro fertilization (IVF) refers to the fertilization process performed out of the human body. The eggs and sperms will be fused together and cultured in a special environment, and then implanted into the uterus once any embryo can be successfully developed (Elder & Dale, 2010). While acknowledging the fact that IVF can help maintain family integrity by bringing great news to infertile couples, some traditional moral and cultural values may be distorted throughout the operating procedures. With the extensive use of this assisted reproductive technology in the recent year, there has been a heated discussion among medical professionals focuses on whether performing IVF will violate the nature. Scholars who doubt the legitimacy of IVF, mainly…show more content…
For each fertilization procedure, several eggs will be collected and fertilized. At the end more than one embryo will be formed. Shannon (1988) doubts whether who can have the right to manage the extra embryos produced, because embryos are the precursor of human beings. Though they are not human, they have the potential to develop into an individual. This article may be considered as an old source, but the above argument appears to be valid as this moral concern is still applicable to today’s situation. Recently, there has been a controversial debate on using the embryos produced during IVF with poor quality for stem cell research. Researchers consistently believe that the use of spare embryos should be encouraged if the physician can follow the regulations, and the most important step would be getting parents’ permission and informed consent (Tu, He & Lu, 2008). Based on the above, it can be argued that even with a comprehensive regulatory system, the ethical concern of human rights is still inevasible. Since it is difficult to define whether embryos should have an equal moral status like human beings, parents should not be the only one having the right to determine the fate of…show more content…
While there is evidence to show that performing IVF will exploit the inherent right to life and the right of being respectable of the embryos, violate the natural law by allowing physicians to choose the desired genes and influencing the traditional family structure. Consequently, I recommend all governments should have a proper regulations to supervise the performance of IVF to minimize the number of embryos wasted, and prevent physicians from practicing genetic screening other than checking for congenital disorder. Although there were related legislation imposed in Hong Kong, such as under the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance, only infertile couples are applicable to undergo the assisted reproductive procedures and conducting embryo research is not allowed, still some countries are lacking a comprehensive regulatory system. In USA and Bangkok, choosing the specific gender are allowed once the client is able to pay. Therefore, more guidance and surveillance are required in order to safeguard of embryos’ human right and maintain the genetic diversity of a

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