Advantage Of OSH

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The advantage of OSH Management is can make a safe workplace, an occupational Health and Safety Management system is enable the organization to identify the hazard, assess a risk and place the necessary risk control measures in place to prevent accident. For example in workplace the work leader must apply the JHA or PTW before start the work. This is important because a worker must now about the danger in workplace, and they must be careful always. The other advantage is Moral, implementing an Occupational Health and Safety Management system shows a clear commitment to safety of the organization staff and can be contribute to a more motivated, efficient and productive workforce. The employer must be care to the worker this is because a worker…show more content…
While the share of world trade to the world 's poorest countries has decreased, workers in these countries increasingly find themselves in insecure, poor-quality jobs, sometimes involving technologies which are obsolete or banned in industrialized countries. The occupational illness which results is generally less visible and not adequately recognized as a problem in lowin come countries. Those outside the workplace can also be affected through, for example, work-related environmental pollution and poor living conditions. In order to reduce the adverse effects of global trade reforms on occupational health, stronger social protection measures must be built into production and trade activities, including improved recognition, prevention, and management of work-related ill-health. Furthermore, the success of production and trade systems should be judged on how well they satisfy both economic growth and population…show more content…
Their needs and aspirations require serious consideration by the international scientific community. When considering the countries of the developing world, it must be appreciated that they do not constitute a homogeneous entity but are a disparate group with different cultural backgrounds and at varying stages of economic and industrial development. But in spite of such diversity, it is possible to establish at least two issues of common interest to these nations. The first is in relation to the setting of environmental standards in the workplace. In the setting of such standards cultural, political, social, economic, and administrative factors must be taken into consideration. In some situations, for economic reasons, the standards may have to be less stringent than the prevailing standards in the industrialized world. On the other hand, because of administrative and health reasons, they may have to be more stringent. The movement of capital and technology, and changes in work organization appear to have outpaced the systems for protecting workers ' health. Work in the agriculture, manufacturing, and mining sectors is already associated with high rates of injury from mechanical, electrical, and physical hazards. In African countries, for example, the injury rates in forestry, electricity production, mining, basic metal production, nonmetallic mineral manufacturing, wood-product manufacturing, and
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