Objects Of Ethnography Analysis

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Synthesis-2 : Aesthetic Perspective: Role of Identity, Audience, Collectors and creators Ethnographers believe in observing the different aspects related to a region or their field of study. Once observed, the interpretations, which are solely their own, are presented to the whole world and the world interprets/sees the region through the lens provided by the ethnographers. In recent years, the tendency of ethnographers, as well as general public, to lean on such observations has been re-evaluated with the help of conversations. In this synthesis I will analyze several sources, which have discussed the importance of creating and including new perspectives into the already existing ones. Such a phenomenon not only gives way…show more content…
The initial step is to identify this tradition which is again "self-identification" of the tales with respect to the country they are being collected While talking about identification, the article “Objects of Ethnography" by Barbara Krishenblatt-Gimblett, has to be mentioned. It talks about the circumstances and surroundings being taken into consideration by the ethnographers before concluding about the context or story related to the object regarding its identity with respect to the site it has been found. "In considering the problem of the ethnographic object, it is useful to distinguish in situ from in context, a pair of terms that calls into question the nature of the whole, the burden of interpretations, and the location of meaning." (Kirshenblatt-Gimblett 388). This line clearly says that the meaning of the objects is derived from the fragments of the object and from the place from where it has been acquired. Though the objects can be modified and re-created to form a new identity, it is necessary to look at the context and site it is…show more content…
Both of them explore the reasons behind the beliefs and faith people have towards few sensitive things. "..The bottom line of my experience-centred theory is the proposition that much folk belief about the spirits is reasonable, that it is rationally developed from experience." (D. J. Hufford 11). He argues that every belief has an experience attached to it which has to be considered before concluding it as something absurd or false. "..Anthropologists use the word “belief" with great assurance, but do not actually know what people mean when they say they believe in something." (Magliocco 8). Magliocco points out the fact that many anthropologists use the word "belief" as a declaration in giving their conclusions without knowing the actual reason behind the formation of the "belief". Two very interesting concepts; romanticism and rationalism have been spoken about by Mary Hufford. Romanticism fears modernization where as rationalism loves it and craves for it. Belief being fluid, makes it rational to changes. When the objects and tales are identified, they are categorised under the romantic notion. But when they
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