African American Abolitionism

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There were many different varieties of abolitionism during the nineteenth century. For many years, the only disapproval of slavery came from the Quakers, free blacks and slave. Most white Americans that wanted to abolish slavery also supported the deportation of freed slaves to the Central America, the Caribbean or Africa. In 1816, supporters created the American Colonization Society, this organization encouraged the slow abolishment of slavery and the colonization black in Americans in Africa. They later created Liberia on the coast of West Africa, where some free blacks did leave to. During the Jacksonian era, political leaders, such as John Marshall, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster and even Jackson himself, supported the Colonization Society.…show more content…
This pamphlet was one of the first signs of the new abolitionism. Walker warned Americans that God would punish them if they did not put an end to slavery and called for black Americans to rally for abolition. He also wanted blacks to embrace who they were and what they were. He wanted them to take pride in African civilizations ' achievements and claim their rights as American born citizens. Walker 's pamphlet scared many Northerners and Southerners and he later died of mysterious circumstances. The new abolitionism truly took root in 1831, when the weekly journal of William Garrison, The Liberator, emerged into society. He was rigid in his stance and commitment to abolition. He suggested that the North should get rid of the Constitution and the Union in order to end its assistance to slavery. Many abolitionists agreed with his criticisms on colonization and rallied for immediate…show more content…
It helped to spread the idea that independent freedom came from ownership of one 's self and the ability to enjoy the benefits of their own labor. They detested the idea of "wage-slavery" and debated that the wage worker was freedom personified in America, since he could change jobs, have a firm family and have the ability to gain property. They also believed that slavery was so engraved within the American lifestyle that its termination would have to have large changes in both the North and the South. The abolitionists demanded that regardless of race, that the absolute right to independent liberty should be more important than other
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