Alan Turing Theory

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Alan Turing is widely considered to be the father of the theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. Was the enigma code unbreakable? The answer to it is No, because Alan Turing did what everyone considered to impossible, he broke the enigma code. Breaking the German enigma code proved to be the tipping point in the victory of the allied forces in World War 2. “Alan Mathison Turing was born on 23rd June 1912. He was the 2nd and last child of Julius Mathison and Ethel Sara Turing. His father was in Indian Civil Service and had met and married Ethel Sara Stoney in Madras.” (Alan Turing: The enigma, 2014). Alan Turing and his brother John were fostered in various English homes until his father’s retirement in India in 1926.…show more content…
There his notes on theory of relativity were highly appreciated. He made a friend, Christopher Morcom who died in February 1930 and Turing decided to complete what Morcom was unable to do. He went deeper into the Quantum Mechanical Theory affecting mind and matter. This later helped in transition from emotional to rigorous, intellectual enquiry. One triumph followed another. He received a distinguished degree in 1934, a fellowship of Kings College in 1935 and a Smith’s prize in 1936, for work on probability Theory. He engineered a gear-weal part for a machine to calculate the Riemann Zeta function. Then he made The Enigma Cipher machine. The concept of Turing machine in August 1936 became the foundation of the modern Theory for computation and probability. Alan Turing appears now as the founder of computer science although he was not acknowledged during his own…show more content…
The Turing test is still considered a benchmark for charting the progression of A.I, although some question whether or not it 's still relevant because no computer is has been able to score a passing mark. His brilliance was exhibited when he created a chess computer program for a computer that was yet to exist, when he then tried to install it on an existing computer it simply failed. Fast forward some 48 years to 1996 and you could imagine his joy if he 'd been able to witness IBM 's Deep Blue chess computer beating world champion chess player, Gary Kasparov. I myself being in the field of computer science am simply astonished how a person can think 50 years ahead and make something that did not even existed then. The resultant effect of his work on the first computer are too long to list here, but it paved way for the technology that has changed the world and significantly improved the quality of human life. It has also radically changed our lives, we 're now reliant on computers to provide us with answers and cure our
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