Alexander Hamilton's Economic Plan Research Paper

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Early America was similar to a small child: it could not always make the best decisions. When America was young, the government made many choices that did not always do good for the common people. Four examples of this were Alexander Hamilton’s economic plan, the Alien and Sedition Acts, Marbury v. Madison, and the War of 1812 (Danzer 184-185, 195, 199, 202-205, History.com 1-3, “Marbury v. Madison (1803)” 1-2) First, Alexander Hamilton’s financial plan almost instantly helped the U.S. government and lots of Northerners (mostly Federalists), but not the Southerners. This financial plan was made to resolve the U.S. debt by lifting the burden from the states and laying it upon the Federal Government. Although this did not affect all U.S. citizens,…show more content…
government would be creation of the Alien and Sedition Acts. Not too long after the Revolutionary War, lots of immigrants from other countries such as France came to the U.S. and almost immediately joined a political party. Most immigrants joined the Democratic-Republican party and voted likewise, and Federalists saw this as a threat to their power. To prevent the Democratic-Republican party from gaining power, the Federalists passed the “Alien and Sedition Acts.” These acts made it much harder if not impossible for immigrants to vote in the United States until they had fourteen years of residence, and also allowed the president to “deport or jail any alien considered undesirable” (Danzer 195). These acts were hated by Federalists and Democratic-Republicans alike, and were deemed unconstitutional (Danzer…show more content…
This war was started for a few reasons: the British were kidnapping U.S. sailors and forcing them into the Navy, attempting to restrict trade with America, and fighting a war with an ally country, France. Congressmen called “warhawks” strongly encouraged the war although little to no preparation was made. The warhawks wanted to use the war as a way to gain land in Canada without having to fight all of the British troops due to the French war. Although the war was declared, the House and Senate were “bitterly divided” on the issue, according to History.com. Most battles fought were undecided, but the British eventually ended the war with France and used all of their armed forces against America. They then proceeded to burn down the White House and many other government buildings. When the war was over, the Treaty of Ghent was signed on December 24, 1814. The treaty did not cover the kidnapping at sea or trade issues, but the United States wanted peace as soon as possible. After a few years, relations between America and Britain improved, issues between the two countries were addressed for the first time since the American Revolution, and land boundaries were set for America (Danzer 202-205, History.com
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