Alice Walker The Civil Rights Movement Analysis

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As a College freshman in his second semester, I have learned to deal with the challenges that I have to deal with peaceful, yet exhilarating moment when my mind engages with an author’s thoughts on a page. As John Dewey states “Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” What Dewey insists is from my early days in high school to my first year in college as a freshman, I wanted to know the full concept of English; however, I have now realized this subject would fill in my void of English with noteworthy complexities. This was not the case for most of my second semester in Montgomery College; I always had trouble in various parts of the subject, such as development in thesis statement, sentence writing and reflecting on previous essays.
Writing a thesis statement had been one of my down falls in English. It was challenging to take the first steps past high school in making up a thesis for a paragraph, but a thesis statement for an essay up two pages is a different case. My thoughts on writing a thesis statement are somehow complex to me personal because I
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Throughout my reflections, I have greatly heightened my critical reflection skills. I challenge myself to reflect into a text as deeply as possible and undo every detail to develop a close read. In one of my reflections I reflected, I wrote a reflection on Alice Walker the Civil Rights Movement: “What Good Was It.” I reflected it and found out on what Walkers’ conclusion to her question about the Civil Rights Movement: “what good was it?” When I reflect at one of my essays and see the text, I realize that I am now able to reflect any essay I come by. It is difficult to identify the gaps in my understanding of English as a course, only because I feel like I have much to learn when I wrote essays. I think it would be useful to identify common mistakes in my task in mastering English in order to master the concept of the subject. I will have to study harder to be better than ever in the
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