Destruction Of War

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War obliterates not only the minds and bodies of soldiers involved, but a multitude of aspects of the societies from whence they came. It is incredibly naive to think that such battles that took place during the great wars, or any other large conflict, could only limit their destruction to the grounds on which they took place. Works such as A Tale of Two Cities, All Quiet on the Western Front, and The Book Thief, cannot emphasise this scale of devastation that war is able to achieve to a greater extent. In one of the most quintessential examples of first-hand war experience, All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, horrors of war that go almost unnoticed are revealed. The destruction of the psyche that leave soldiers almost…show more content…
The home front reflects the battles on its front lines. Though almost entirely absent of the theatre of World War II in its frigid bitterness, The Book Thief depicts such a battlefield that is ugly to a comparable degree. Faced with poverty, the threat of an extremist Nazi party, and petty thievery, Liesel and her foster family go through a copious amount of struggles simply for…show more content…
War has always hidden as a plague in the crossfire of shrouded battlefields. A Tale of Two Cities is one example that shows how war can seem for the greater good, when it is actually a hideous mess. Whether for revolution, or the spread of a new ideology, war always comes at a great cost and always has. Following the French revolution, just another awful conflict to throw upon the heap of humanity’s ugliness, A Tale of Two Cities depicts this conflict from multiple perspectives, the two perspectives being a derivative of the title of the book itself. It was these two perspectives which, among the obvious revolutionary conflict, spurred yet another conflict. For those for and against the revolution, there lied, ironically, another revolution. Almost as if the revolution were a totalitarian French government within itself, the revolution caused people to grow power hungry in the story and could be seen in many instances. So extreme was this to an extent that if anyone opposing the revolution or even thought to be was found, they would have been killed on the spot. This war, like many others, caused those victim to it to dedicate the full capacity of their minds to the conflict, free of influence from any morals previously held dear. It was simply a task of killing the right people at the right pace all to ensure the fruition of one’s vision of the
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