Allen Ginsberg's Impact On American Culture

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The lights of neon signs stretch down the street while the sound of breaking bottles, and yelling angry men orchestrate the smoky nights of the 1950s. The men drowning them selves in liquid depression trying to block the eerie memory of an artillery gun blasting in the distance. The women broken and lost as their only relief are packs of cigarettes, and endless bottles of wine. With losing so much to a war that shook the entire world, the only remedies would possibly be just that. This is only the beginning of pro war change, and of course, it is never easy, and it never will be. The country was heading towards a road where control would be completely dominate. This comes to my ultimate statement. I believe Allen Ginsberg had a personal war …show more content…

When I look back into my childhood, the ideas that the U.S is the best was drilled into my head nearly every single day. After some growing up, some research, and some traveling under my belt I could start to see the reality of it all. With all the problems that the country has today, it’s solely because of the issues that Allen Ginsberg was trying to expose in the past and the country refused to acknowledge it. Shortly after Allen graduated in 1948 he was arrested for being an accomplice to a robbery. Luckily he dodged some jail time, but instead was sent to a mental hospital for the plead of insanity. It was there where I think the fire was set to begin writing against the hypocrisy of the country. (Allen Ginsberg, bio.) (Ginsberg’s Life, Modern American …show more content…

This was perfect for Allen. He was fresh into freedom, yet he was fuming over just how blind society is. It wasn’t much longer when Allen wrote more poems and did a lot of recites in galleries. Finally, in 1955, Allen recited “Howl” at a gallery, which late became an important manifesto of the best generation. “Howl and other Poems” made the country see the reality of what was happening inside the country as it explored sexuality to social issues. How ever, it was again clear that Allen was truly upset at what was happening. “America I’ve given you all and now I am nothing. America when will we end the human war? I’m sick of your demands”(Howl and other poems, America, lines 1,4 and 14) These lines surly show that America was on a brink of constant change, but not the kind of change we would have expected after a war. In fact, what was upsetting Allen was the fact that the war never did end. The Korean war followed, and Vietnam shortly after. In each, the country demanded more from its people, more blood, more money, more sacrifice, and more, well, just everything else. With that, Allen used his gifted skill to get the world to see these issues in his own crazy mind. (Allen Ginsberg, Bio.) (Adam Ginsberg’s

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