American Civil War: Why Would The South Secede?

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the civil war The American civil war (April 12, 1861- May 9, 1865), now you might be thinking to yourself Why would the south secede? and where they justified to do so? Those are good question and I 'll answer them right now. Here 's why the south seceded... The North was industrial, and the South was agricultural. This meant that the South 's exports earned more money. The North didn 't like earning less money than the South, so they taxed the South. Anytime a Southerner wanted to export their goods, they had a pay a large tariff. The Southerners felt they were being treated like colonies with no real say in anything. So they did what had to be done, they seceded. Here 's why the south was justified... They felt that the federal government was overbearing and heavy handed.…show more content…
The year is 1863 and the cvil war in now in full swing: The tide of war shifted noticeably in favor of the Union in 1863, despite a brilliant victory by Robert E. Lee in the Battle of Chancellorsville, a battle that cost the life of his daring lieutenant Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. Lee then suffered a major defeat at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in early July. The victor, George Gordon Meade, did not pursue aggressively, and the Confederate “Gray Fox” escaped to fight another day. The two antagonists met again in November in a confused, inconclusive affair known as the Mine Run Campaign. The Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (July 1–July 3, 1863), was the largest battle of the American Civil War as well as the largest battle ever fought in North America, involving around 85,000 men in the Union’s Army of the Potomac under Major General George Gordon Meade and approximately 75,000 in the Confederacy’s Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert Edward Lee. Casualties at Gettysburg totaled 23,049 for the Union (3,155 dead, 14,529 wounded, 5,365 missing). Confederate casualties were 28,063 (3,903 dead, 18,735 injured, and 5,425 missing), more than a third of Lee’s
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