American Immigration Policy

1043 Words5 Pages
For many decades, immigration has been one of the crucial forces in American society. Immigration has had a significant impact on the process of re-shaping American cities, families, education system, culture, racial dynamics, politics, as well as the American labor market. The influence has been shown in the historical evolution of immigration policies. Immigration to America and the changes in the American immigration policies are accompanied by both economic costs and benefits. The immigration policies have had various effects on the performance of the American economy as well as the immigration process itself. The most renowned policies that changed the course of immigration are discussed in the chapters “Immigrant Voters in a Partisan…show more content…
Most of these agendas were necessary for the partisan structures and electoral contests (Tichenor 46). These plans dominated the political life during the nineteenth century. This era was characterized by the efforts that the federal government put to ensure the exclusion of various immigrant groups such as Germans, Irish people, among others. Even though immigrants were allowed into the U.S., different ideologies prevented ‘efficient’ migration. During this period, both the local and state governments played a crucial role in regulating the immigration and legal status of foreigners (Tichenor 47). However, some implied restrictions were lifted as the courts intervened to control the local and state immigration laws. The courts also supplemented the development of bureaucratic provisions and federal regulatory roles that allowed effective governing of the immigration policies. Through these provisions, the nativists experienced defeat in their effort to stop European migration and…show more content…
This policy addressed the implementations and achievements of the various statutory provisions that supplemented effective immigration. It emerged between the 1930s and the 1940s. This immigration bureaucracy incorporated two layers of immigration control. The first layer dealt with the administration procedures conducted by various State Department agencies that used broad exclusionary authority in foreign countries. Consular officials also exercised control over immigration in which they controlled both Asian and European migration. The second layer of the two-tiered bureaucracy was controlled by the Immigration Bureau and Labor Department. This layer focused on promoting the legal entry of immigrants from Latin
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