American Imperialism Research Paper

1437 Words6 Pages
The face of American democracy is deceptive; from missionary trips to military tours, America’s global dominion has always been referenced with coy euphemisms—“diplomacy,” “leadership,” tying to mask imperialism as setting a good example. As America tries to up hold their motto of being the land of the free, they force their ideals on other countries with or without the support of the people living there. While America focuses on spreading American ideals across the globe, its own citizens don’t even live in an ideal America. Black Americans have been discriminated against since America was founded; from slavery to the Jim Crow south, Black Americans have fought for their rights and against American imperialism. The Middle East is no different;…show more content…
In 1899, the United States helped the Philippines break away from Spain; although the U.S. was helping the Philippines in their fight for independence, the U.S. took control of the Philippines as soon as they were free of Spain. This act of imperialism caused the Philippine-American war, which was a continuation of the Philippine struggle for independence. In addition to the Philippines, the United States also invaded Haiti in 1915. Although American involvement in Haiti was to bring about political stability, the U.S. was more of a controlling force than an aiding factor and they prevented Haiti from securing their own democracy. The U.S. has placed military bases in countries all around the world: Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico, Cuba and many other places have all had their brush with American imperialism and the United States has projected the idea that their involvement in other countries affairs are only beneficial exchanges that are for the good for spreading…show more content…
Slavery was practiced in America from the 17th century through the 19th century; Africans were brought over through the middle passage and were sold as chattel to southern plantation owners. Despite the South’s immense support of the institution of Slavery, Northern states opposed it and their opposing views resulted in the South’s secession from the United States and the beginning of the American civil war. From 1861 to 1865, the Union and the Confederacy fought over the south’s secession and the institution of slavery and in 1865, the Union won the war against the Confederacy and they passed the 13th amendment which officially outlawed the institution of slavery in the United States. In 1868 the 14th amendment made all slaves U.S. citizens. Even though the Union’s victory gave millions of Blacks their freedom, Blacks faced challenges and injustices; the legacy of slavery and anti-black sentiments continued to influence American society and its poor treatment of Blacks. After the failed reconstruction era to help integrate Black Americans into society, the era of Jim Crow began and Southern states again enacted a series of laws called “Pig Laws” intended to restrict the rights of Blacks. Jim Crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south from the end of reconstruction to the beginning of the civil
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