American Literary Fiction Literary Analysis

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REAL LIFE WRITINGS IN AMERICAN LITERARY JOURNALISM: A NARRATOLOGICAL STUDY Foreword In the modern era, science and technology have pierced through every corner of human life, leaving man with a feeling of nothingness without it. It is sad to know that man has thought himself to be the unconquerable, but the bitter reality is that the unconquerable has become destructive. Moreover, it is a fact that all is not well with the age of globalization and technology. Modern man is not having enough clarity between what is real and what is its construction, the right and wrong, the fact and fiction, and the clear and the ambiguous. This is the dilemma of every individual in the present culture and society. With the drastic changes coming…show more content…
He also enlisted “the boundaries of the form”: (1) immersion, or what Wolfe calls “saturation” reporting ; (2) structure; (3) accuracy; (4) voice; (5) responsibility; (6) underlying meaning or symbolism (8). For him ‘accuracy’ is one of the defining characteristics of literary journalism. Mark Kramer, another literary journalist and educator, has a belief that there is a contract between the literary journalist and readers that ‘the writers do what they appear to do, which is to get reality as straight as they can manage, and not make it up’ (1995: 23). L. Wilkins (1989: 181) defines literary journalism as a story ‘which connects the objective facts of the event with the cultural facts of symbols and myth.’ Characters, also, should not be wholly invented by the author nor composed from two or more real people (Sims 1984: 15). For Barbara Lounsberry the basic four features of literary or artistic nonfiction are: (1) documentable subject matter; (2) exhaustive research; (3) the scene; and (4) fine…show more content…
Several books about this genre appeared like Harold Hayes’ collection of Esquire pieces, Smiling Through The Apocalypse: Esquire’s History Of The Sixties (1969); Michael Johnson’s The New Journalism (1971); Tom Wolfe and E.W. Johnson’s canonical anthology The New Journalism (1973); Charles C. Flippen’s Liberating the Media: The New Journalism (1974). Further Ronald Weber’s (Ed.) The Reporter as Artist: A Look at the New Journalism Controversy (1974) remains the best collection of contemporary pieces. Some of the essays in, Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century (1990) by Norman Sims (Ed.) also deal with the journalistic fiction. One can find biographical and critical profiles of a number of new journalists in, A Sourcebook of American Literary Journalism: Representative Writers in an Emerging Genre (1992) by Thomas Connery. John C. Hartsock shows in his revealing study, A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Literary Form, that the roots of this distinctive form of writing can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth
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