An Analysis Of Ray Bradbury's There Will Come Soft Rains

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Bradbury is suggesting that technology can lead to our demise. He thinks that if we let technology get too advanced, we will get to dependent on it, which will lead to our ultimate end. Bradbury’s “There Will Come Soft Rains” is a look into what was a possible future if the Cold War actually spiraled into nuclear war and more atomic bombs were dropped. The story was written in 1950 right around when the Cold War was and the “Red Scare” was a credible threat. It takes place and happen in the then distant future in August 2026. The story starts with the house trying to get the owners to get up and start their daily duties. The house does not realize that the owners are dead and has no way to figure out, do to it not having the intelligence to…show more content…
He became a "student of life," selling newspapers on L.A. street corners from 1938 to 1942, spending his nights in the public library and his days at the typewriter. He became a full-time writer in 1943, and contributed numerous short stories to periodicals before publishing a collection of them, Dark Carnival, in 1947. He wrote about a lot of different topics, including things he saw as harmful to the future of mankind. The story “There Will Come Soft Rains” talks about how the house is still running despite life being completely wiped out due to technology advanced further than it should have and humanity’s dependence on…show more content…
The poem within the story describes how happy nature will be when man has destroyed himself, but the truth is that nature has been decimated by the war. The dog that comes in to die is lean and covered with sores. The rest of the city is "rubble and ashes." Radiation hangs in the air. Yet nature lives on in a mechanical form. Mechanical mice scurry about the house. The closest thing to soft rains that fall are the mechanical rains of the sprinkler system that goes off when the house catches fire. The poem, which seems pessimistic, is actually very optimistic compared to the reality. In this penultimate story, Bradbury shows his final example of the folly of thoughtless technological development. It is no wonder that some in the Science Fiction community accuse him of being
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