An Analysis Of Sir Gawain: Chivalrous Knight

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Sir Gawain: Chivalrous Knight or Average Human In the epic Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain makes a valiant effort to hold himself to the Chivalric Code; however, in many instances throughout the epic he falls short of the standard he chooses to live by. Certainly it would be difficult for any person to uphold every aspect of the Chivalric Code in its entirety and in every moment or situation, just as it is difficult for many people to live up to the standards set by their faith or the laws set by their government. Nothing short of Sir Gawain’s life is at stake during the epic, but had it not been it is possible he would be considered a better person and fails in his pursuit because he is further tested than the average person.…show more content…
On her first visit to Sir Gawain’s bedroom the queen seems to hold nothing back while trying to persuade him to have a tryst. Although Sir Gawain asks her to allow him to dress before they continue their conversation she refuses and lets him know that she has more in mind than a lively discussion with him. She says to Sir Gawain “we are all by ourselves my husband and his huntsmen far hence ridden…To my body will you welcome be of delight to take your fill” (Tolkien 70). Despite this and other strongly worded propositions from the queen Sir Gawain finds a way to dissuade her and does it without insulting her or disrespecting his host. The second time the queen visits Sir Gawain he resists her despite how aggressively she offers herself to Sir Gawain. It is said that she “tested and tried him tempting him often, so as to allure him to love-making” (Tolkien 83), but despite her apparent eagerness to offer him her body he resists. She herself admits that “I have set by your very self now for the second time, yet your mouth has never made any remark I have heard that ever belonged to love making” (Tolkien 82). On the third visit he narrowly resists the temptation that the queen provides “for she queenly and peerless, pressed him so closely, led him so near the line, that at last he must need either…show more content…
Sir Gawain’s display of valor begins when he accepts the challenge of the Green Knight. As King Arthur steps forward to accept the challenge brought forth by the Green Knight, Sir Gawain intervenes telling King Arthur that because his loss would be too great and he himself volunteers in Arthur’s place. Sir Gawain
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