Analysis Of All Quiet On The Western Front

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All Quiet on the Western Front was an extremely powerful book, which gave an insight to the strong emotions felt by soldiers of World War I. World War I turned young boys into men, through their experiences during the war. If they returned home after the war, their lives before the war no longer existed and their outlook on the world was completely different. This book did an outstanding job of bringing to life the hardships of German soldiers throughout the First World War. Although the men in the book started as classmates, they became a pack that stood together through the tough terrain of the war. Therefore, this book really reflected as a unification event of the second company between Paul and his other combatants as they came together …show more content…

Since there were only eight men standing guard of the village, they had to trust one another and to support one another. The village seemed to be of abundance of food and two little hogs that made the stay easier. This trust and support from one another helped distinguish a combined nature between the men and the army. Soldiers of a company had to support and help each other to be successful, and to stay alive as long as they can. These men must not turn their back because if they did it would have a major effect on the entire German army. The entire army must take care of its own, even though Paul came face to face with the enemy, he knew that war is war and he must have killed to stay …show more content…

For many more reasons it is seen as a unifying experience, but for reasons it is also an alienating experience. For example, Paul and his classmates left home at a young age to fight in the war and they also left school, this did not allow them the same opportunities that women that age would have received or even other men who did not join the war. It also alienated him from his family; he spent many months away from his family, in which his mother became ill and constantly thought of her son fighting for his life on the frontline. It became apparent in the book that he became so distant from the life he once lived when he returned home after he had been on the front. Paul’s relationship with his family was no longer present he mostly had thoughts of the war, which kept his mind preoccupied. Additionally, this event could have been alienating due to the constant loss of friends and fellow soldiers. The loss of a friend left the soldiers feeling alone, but often times they would take personal belongings from soldiers to use for themselves. All of these actions and events could take a roll in the alienation of World War

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