Sexuality: A Literary Analysis

1191 Words5 Pages
The perspective of four writers shows the intersectional relationship between race, class, gender and how they create a human’s sexuality with the influences of political and social powers. This shows that sexuality is not simply a private choice, but a public matter. Which also brings up the idea that sexuality is not only dependent on one’s sexual acts or desire but also focuses on the social, economic and political consequences that are placed on an individual. These four writers are Anne McClintock, Dean Spade, Margaret Sanger, and Audre Lorde; respectively, they wrote “Imperial Leather”, “Administrating Gender”, “Free Motherhood”, and ‘Zami: A New Spelling of My Name”. These four used their readings to express the hardships women and…show more content…
There was always a defined line between men and women when it came to power, respect, autonomy, and much more. This is also brought up in the three other readings. Furthermore, McClintock noticed how women, especially colonized women were at a large disadvantage within their society. Not only does their darker skin color bring them at a disadvantage, but their gender as well. They were not autonomous people nor did they have personal or political sovereignty. McClintock states that “feminism is as much about class, race, work, and money as it is about sex” (McClintock 7). This statement allows readers to realize that femininity and sexuality are more than just sex and sexual desires. Not every woman had power over their own…show more content…
This aligns with McClintock’s reading. It confirms the idea that they do not believe women back in the day had the ability to control their own body. People with more power or control would make women labor slaves and use the women’s sexuality to benefit them. However, Sangers reading also talks about motherhood and choosing to become pregnant or getting pregnant against their will. This shows that some women had power over their own sexuality and got to express it freely. In contrast, other women were used as “incubators” to simply bare the child and take care of them when they are born (Sanger
Open Document