Analysis Of Beatrix Potter's The Tale Of Peter Rabbit

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In Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Peter Rabbit, Potter shows the influence her childhood has on her timeless children’s book. Potter grew up in solitude for most of her childhood with only animals and nature to play with, and was later influenced heavily by these. As she grew older, Potter showed an interest in fine arts, literature, and even the scientific research of fungi (Coupland). Beatrix Potter was a strong woman who endured through many hardships and times of depression to create her world famous children’s book: The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Beatrix Potter was born in Kensington, England on July 28th, 1866 to a rich family. During her childhood, Potter saw her nannies and the house servants more than her own parents. At the age of five,…show more content…
Potter’s parents were always domineering; this is known because of Potter’s many journal entries, which were written in secret code that was to be broken years later, and finally published (West). Beatrix Potter was not allowed to have friends and most of the time, she was not permitted to leave her house for her parents fears of germs and corruption from other children. Potter was not allowed to make many, decisions during her youth (Lane). Because of Potter’s parental neglection, she grew very close to her brother, Bertram. Bertram became Beatrix Potter’s best, and only, friend. Bertram was sent away by the Potter’s to a boarding school, leaving Beatrix Potter lonesome, depressed, and angry at her parents’ decision…show more content…
. . in a sand bank, underneath the root of a very big fir tree” (9). The story continues to Mrs. Rabbit warning her children to no go into Mr. McGregor’s garden because their father did and was turned into rabbit pie. Even after this warning from his mother, Peter Rabbit goes into Mr. McGregor’s garden and eats his vegetables. Once Peter is caught, he runs away and hides in a can in the tool-shed. Peter begins to realize there is consequence to his actions and starts crying. Soon after, Peter “. . . slipped underneath the gate, and was safe in the wood outside the garden” (50). Peter Rabbit finally made it home but was “. . . not doing very well . . .” so his mother cared for him
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