Analysis Of Edward Morgan Forster's A Passage To India

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At the beginning of the seventeenth century, the British decided to trade with a large country full of new and attractive resources. They wanted the right to trade and do business there and they aim for it until they finally succeeded. By the late eighteenth century and by the early nineteenth century, after that the British government was ruling India and already well-anchored, riots occurred. Even then, Britain remained in control. Finally, India became one of the most important, famous and illustrious outposts of the British Empire among all its colonies. Edward Morgan Forster was an author from the twentieth century. He stood against the entire setting of the British Empire and for the Indian independence during the 1920s. It took two…show more content…
Edward Morgan Forster wants to show us the main problem of Britain’s control in India on a more individual level. At the beginning of the novel and until he met Mrs. Moore, Aziz is contemptuous towards the British, considering them as a comedy, a complete fraud in his own country or by simply ignoring them. However, the unexpected encounter between Aziz and Mrs. Moore in the mosque during a meal organised by Major Callendar. Aziz is astonish how she understands and respects his religion and opens his eyes to the possibility of a friendship and maybe some kind of affection between them and more generally between Indians and Englishmen1. For a part of the novel, Forster wants to show us that the cohabitation between these two different ethnic groups can be possible if they treat each other with respect and equality just as Aziz and Fielding treat each other. They are intelligent, frank and well-mannered and that is why their relationship is successful at first. We can quote from the part of the novel, chapter XI “But they were friends, brothers. That part was settled, their compact had been suscribed by the photograph, they trusted one another, affection had triumphed for once in a way.” It shows that a friendship between British and Indians is possible, even if that relationship will crumble throughout the second

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