Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights

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Emily Brontë’s masterclass of Wuthering Heights’ is renowned as a classic Victorian era novel. In the novel, Lockwood is told the story of two families by Nelly Dean. The book follows Nelly’s experiences at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. The book contains the experiences of Heathcliff, who comes to the Heights, makes friends, enemies and ultimately, dies alone. In between, a lot of tragic events occur which strongly impact the novel. Isabella regrets her decision and becomes homesick, Heathcliff gives up, and Frances’ life and death has an important affect on the novel. Similarly, Emily Brontë’s life is impacted by tragic events which greatly change her life. Emily Brontë uses Wuthering Heights’ and it’s characters to show her experiences…show more content…
From a young age, Brontë suffered many deaths in her close family. First, her mother passed away when Emily was at a young age. Soon, two of her sisters passed away due to Tuberculosis. At this point, Emily became scared of forging close relationships due to the sufferings she would have to go through when they inevitably died. Unfortunately, her brother Branwell also left the world soon after. All the deaths Emily had to go through at such a vulnerable age left scars that wouldn’t heal. Emily also loved her home and often got homesick whenever she was away. Similarly, Wuthering Heights follows a close path of death and tragedy. Frances’ death has a tremendous negative affect on Hindley. Isabella’s life is ruined by her regretful marriage with Heathcliff. Heathcliff’s life is turned upside down by the death of Catherine. Emily Brontë is constantly plagued by tragedies in her life which is reflected in the plot of constant turmoil in Wuthering…show more content…
In the novel, Heathcliff loses all the people who cared for him in Mr. Earnshaw and Catherine. Then, he lives a sad and pitiable existence. Heathcliff’s callousness is shown when he tells Nelly that he “takes so little interest in [his] daily life that [he] hardly remembers to eat and drink” (Brontë 108-109). After losing all he cared for in Catherine, Heathcliff is simply finished inside. His entire life was based upon the goal of Catherine and since he failed to achieve that goal, he set out to take revenge on those who he considered had wronged him. But now, he doesn’t have the life inside him to care. The description of Heathcliff follows the one of Emily Brontë as in Brontë was a “dejected, melancholic and hysteric individual who endeavored to ease the pain of such a wound by reenacting, echoing and projecting her obsessions onto her phantasy world” (Pourya 2). It is explained that Brontë was a melancholic and sad individual which Heathcliff happens to be. Moreover, Pourya reveals that Brontë projected her troubles into her fantasy worlds, such as Wuthering Heights. Additionally, Heathcliff suffers similar wounds to Brontë in the deaths of people who cared for him. Another prevalence of Brontë’s experiences is shown in the location of Wuthering Heights. Lockwood exclaims from the beginning that he “could not have fixed on a situation so completely
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