Analysis Of Ernest Hemingway's A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

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For Lack of Meaning "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place", gives us a rather bleak but fair outlook on the world. Ernest Hemingway takes us back to a time where it seems as though people and their lack of value for one another, and life itself, are at their peak. Although there are many exceptions, in our present day and age, the vast majority of us also lack the presence of a deeper meaning and value in our own lives as well as one another 's. The way in which the waiters gossip to one another about the old man they barely know, leaves us with a rather ominous feeling. As they carry out a conversation amongst themselves, the waiter…show more content…
154). It is almost shocking to hear a fellow human speak about another in such a disregarding manner. The words he chose might be a bit more understandable if he knew the sad old man, personally in a negative way, but he did not. All the waiter thought of the old man, was that he was an inconvenience. The cynical waiter didn 't even pause to think what the deaf old man could have been going through that might have led to his attempted suicide. What was keeping the old man up and pounding back brandy all night? No one cared enough to show any empathy or concern. No one except perhaps, the unhurried waiter. To top it off with the horrid way in which they are speaking to one another, the cynical waiter approaches the old man to serve him more brandy and says "you should have killed yourself last week" (p. 154). Now he says this out loud to him because he knows the old man is deaf. But even if he wasn 't, he would have said something just as disrespectful. Even though what he knows of the old man and what he said about him, the waiter still holds the…show more content…
This is probably due to the fact that the writer is trying to make apparent the lack of meaning in every life presented. It gives off the feeling that that 's just the way it is, and always will be. The waiters are just referred to as their job title, and the old man is just "a nasty thing" (p. 154) according to the cynical one. These ways of making people out to seem less significant are very present in our modern day and age as well. Have you ever caught yourself speaking or thinking about someone you don 't know in a judgmental way? Have you ever been criticized and treated coldly by someone with no empathy? We all have whether we mean it or not. There is a good portion of people on this Earth who will write others off simply for being elderly, poor, depressed, broken, etc. I am positive that enough people can relate to such things; no empathetic pains and no mercy for someone who could have just as easily been them. It is widely spread in our society that we must be somebody; somebody good, strong,
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