Analysis Of Feminism In Fairytales

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In this section the facts and information will be displayed as a result of the research that has been conducted, and conferred in the methodology, so as to be able to understand the discussion and analysis in the next segment. 6.1 Feminism and Fairytales How different branches of feminism can be applied to fairytales vary greatly. To keep this essay focused on sexuality and gender. Marxist feminism explains that the oppression of women as a result of economical control through capitalism, with a focus on the domestication of women as a result of economical control leading to further oppression of women socially. Women in fairytales assume the character trait of wanting to appease the male gaze to receive wealth and status, and thus remain…show more content…
These are all archetypes commonly found in classical fairytales and they each posses certain traits. Though these aren't the only ones and there are exceptions, these will be the only ones presented in depth here as they are the most commonly reoccurring ones. Fables exemplify the ways that social structure, and the patriarchy, attempts to hush and mistreat women by portraying them inactive. A significant part of the tall tale writing strengthens the thought that women ought to be wives or mothers, compliant and benevolent. Ladies in stories are to be quiet and passive, without aspiration, lovely and eager to wed. The maiden, or the princess, is often portrayed or supposed to be the heroin of a story. She possesses several typical feminine traits an is a force of good and light. She is described as fair, kind and gentle. For example Talia or Briar-Rose in the different versions of classical adaptations of Sleeping beauty. Giambattista Basile's version og the classic Sleeping Beauty depicts a scene in which Talia's beauty is apparently too much to bare for the king who stumbles upon her, resulting in…show more content…
A direct correlation between appearance and disposition here as well. The stepmothers are greedy, jealous, ambitious and have a strong sense of pride. Although they may be described as beautiful or regal it is not without its own downfall as pride is decidedly not effeminate. The queen in Snow White is a prime example of this. ''She was a beautiful woman, but she was proud and arrogant, and she could not stand it if anyone might surpass her in beauty. She had a magic mirror. Every morning she stood before it, looked at herself, and said: Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who in this land is fairest of all? To this the mirror answered: You, my queen, are fairest of all.'' When she later learns that her beauty is surpassed by that of Snow White's she becomes obsessed with regaining her status as the most desirable, so she orders the death of Snow White. The huntsman given the task refuses to do so once he takes pity on Snow White, not because he is opposed to killing a girl, but because he is enthralled by her beauty. After several murder attempts the queen ends up dead as beauty and the maiden prevails. Possessing so called undesirable characteristics in women is ultimately what kills the
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