Analysis Of Hip-Hop's Betrayal Of Black Women

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In her essay “hip hop’s betrayal of black women,” Jennifer McLune implies that “(h)ip-hop owes its success to the ideology of women-hating” (193). She does not agree with Kevin Powell’s article that hip-hop does not mean to “offend” black women, but instead artists are only letting out their temper throughout their music. McLune feels infuriated that many artists in hip hop (including black men) rap about their community and downgrade their own women. In the hip-hop genre, sexism is mainly used, not only by black men but also by many other race hip-hop artists. Artists assume that women-hating in their rap songs will be accepted by women, but do not realize that it is affecting all women. Some lyrics focus on success and making money. Nevertheless,…show more content…
Jennifer McLune implies that even though these male artists are being raised in poverty, so are the women who raised them. McLune says in her article “…women, too, are raised in this environment of poverty…but have yet to produce the same negative and hateful representation of black men…” (193). McLune also disagrees with him and states that even the white male rappers are involved in misogynistic songs and they were not even raised in poverty. McLune believes that Powell is only trying to excuse these artists with the way they are making their…show more content…
Artists that participate in misogyny songs insinuate that woman-hating is a good thing. Black male rappers are not the only ones raised in poverty, so there should not be any reason for Powell to excuse in why their songs are misogynistic. The society should not agree with what women are being categorized in, and should not give wealth to those who do participate in misogyny. As a society we should work on being equal, males and females. We have the same respiratory system, the same heart, the same brain. We should not be told one is less than the

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