Weisbord's Six-Box Model Analysis

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Register to read the introduction…Why is change so important to an organization? According to Burke (2011), compared to the past, the external environment is changing much more rapidly than organizations are. This would infer that if modern organizations are to keep up with their competitors, they need to properly embrace change. The purpose of this paper was to examine the Weisbord’s Six-Box Model, the input/throughput/output model, organization change, resistance to change, system boundaries, and how power/leadership is exercised within the system and organization. Weisbord’s Six-Box Model A diagnostic tool created by Marvin Weisbord called the Weisbord Six Box Model is commonly used to diagnose problems within modern organizations (Weisbord, 1976). According to Burke (2011), Weisbord’s tool helps managers and leaders visually diagnose problems within an organization. Weisbord used the analogy of an air traffic controller’s radar screen. The six “blips” on the screen tell us what is the most important and the blips intensity indicates the troubled areas (Burke, 2011). Burke also stated, the six boxes illustrate each organizational component: purpose, structure, rewards,…show more content…
If the organization the author works for implemented the six-box model, the executive management team would have a simple yet powerful tool for quickly diagnosing problems. Additionally, first line leaders and team leaders would also benefit from using this model. Since the six-box model is simple to understand, leaders from each department would be on the same page no matter which department they were in or what level of leadership they represented. The use of this model would save time by helping to diagnose problems quickly, so managers can spend time correcting problem areas within the…show more content…
Burke (2011) stated Kurt Lewin created a theory for leading people through change. Lewin’s three-step model, conceived during the 1950’s, is known as Unfreezing-Moving-Refreezing. The first stage, unfreezing, involves preparing the organization for change. During this stage leaders would display data to organizational members showing a large gap between where they are and where they need to be. This form of communication allows the team to understand the need for the change. The second stage, moving, is when the change takes place. Making the necessary changes closes the gap. The third and final stage is called the refreezing stage. During this stage, leaders solidify the change that has taken place. This can be done by installing a reward system or restructuring for accountability (Burke, 2011). Lewin’s change theory is an important model because it helps organizations lead its staff through change in a systematic way. Showing employees why a change is needed instead of just making changes for the sake of making changes can be beneficial for leaders managing change. “Closing the gap” helps employees understand the purpose of the change and allows them to perform more efficiently with less stress and confusion. Finally, solidifying the change helps leaders to complete the change process without having to repeat it
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