Analysis Of Letter To His Son By Robert E. Lee

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Non-fiction literature is necessary as a means of learning from mistakes made by past generations. Reading and studying eyewitness accounts gives individuals access to recognize and strive to prevent the failures of the past. Robert E. Lee, in a “Letter to His Son”, expresses his uncommon opinion about the Civil War and the secession of Southern States. Lee conveys this by saying hope still exists for the country despite the secession of the Southern States at an increased rate. The substantial increase in succession continues to cause the division of the Union, leading to a longer war period and anarchy. Lee addresses the potential failures of the country and shares his opinions on what will follow (Lee 535). The struggles present then included …show more content…

The “Second Inaugural Address”, given by President Abraham Lincoln, gives insight to the problems during the Civil War. In this speech, Lincoln conveys the political unrest that is dividing the country. He discusses the issue of slavery and addresses each viewpoint. Lincoln concludes in suggesting that each side come together to repair the broken nation instead of dividing it further (Lincoln “Inaugural” 533). By reading this presidential speech it is shown just how much one can learn from the past. The speech discloses the tensions of the United States during this time. By reading and analyzing this speech people can work to stop political unrest before it gets to the point that it did during Lincoln’s presidency. The mistakes of previous generations can be prevented by studying eyewitness accounts and political documents from times of …show more content…

Reading individual perspectives allows historians to pull out consistent details to understand the events of the past. Likewise, the differing accounts of history provide future generations with access to understand the lives of different social classes throughout history. Randolph Mckim, a confederate soldier, describes the concluding hours of the Battle of Gettysburg in his diary. Mckim describes the defeat of the Confederate troops saying, “The end soon came. We were beaten back to the line from which we had advanced in a terrible loss, and in much confusion, but the enemy did not make a countercharge.” (Mckim 557). The account given by Mckim gives an individual perspective on one of the major battles of the Civil War. This account allows historians to understand what happened on the confederate side during the Battle of Gettysburg and gives perspective to better understand the strategies and outcome of the war. Furthermore, the future generations can gather more individual perspective on the war through civilian experience. In the diary of Mary Chesnut, a South Carolina civilian during the Civil War, another perspective of the war is displayed. As a civilian close to the action of the war, Chesnut describes her experience during war. The diary starts prior to the war, when Lincoln is first elected and is continued throughout the war. Chesnut describes the

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