Analysis Of Rear Window

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Rear Window (1954) has been viewed from a feminist perspective by critics. Laura Mulvey the feminist film theorist and the author of Visual Pleasures and Narrative Cinema (1975) calls Lisa Fremont a “passive image of visual perfection” (qtd in Keith 1). 1950s is a period marked by the rise in consumer culture, Beatniks at its zenith and the beginning of cold war. The period was struggling hard to find a harmony between innovation and progress on one side and conformity and tradition on the other. Sticking to gender roles was the only solution to achieve a happy and secured life thought politicians and creators of popular culture. Lisa Fremont can be viewd as one such women-a professional unwilling to return to the prewar status of confinement…show more content…
It is rather difficult to critique his films from a patriarchal perspective as he questions and undermines the system which is very evident from his creation of Lisa Fremont. It also suggests Hitchcock’s ideology that female independence and equality are no no longer detrimental or harmful to marriage. At the same time Hitchcock forsees danger in maintaining the tradition of male authority. Spoto opines that “the highly moralistic Hithcock describes the devastating effect of crime on the victim; his real contempt is for the victimizer, in every case a man. In most Hithcock romances, the woman is courageous precisely because she is willing to risk so much for love—something alien to the manipulative, ungrownupman” (qtd in Keith 1). This aspect of Hithcock films undermine the efforts of some critics to treat him as misogynist. Lisa displays her mettle by climbing the balcony onto a second story window ledge, like a sleuth to win the heart of Jeff. This is one instance where she behaves contrary to the female passivity in narrative cinema which Mulvey talks about. Lisa is brave, active and powerful woman (Keith 1-2). It is seen that Hithcock’s most successful female characters are the ones who challenge traditional gender roles and having a strong sense of self that exists outside male
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