Analysis Of The Poem 'Bonnie And Clyde Go Down Together'

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“Bonnie and Clyde Go down Together”
Bonnie Parker was the child of Emma and Charles Parker. Clyde Barrow was the son of Henrey and Cummie Barrow. Both Bonnie and Clyde had lived very poor lives while growing up and into adulthood. But Bonnie and Clyde had always had a close relationship with their families.
Even though Bonnie Parker was known as a criminal she had a soft side to her. Bonnie Elizabeth Parker was born on October 1, 1910. As Bonnie grew up to be a small child she had two parents Emma and Charles, when Bonnie was just four years old her father Charles had died. Leaving Bonnie her mother Emma and her two siblings Hubert and Billie Jean. Soon after Bonnie’s father had died Bonnie had decided she wanted to be a famous actress and be on broadway. Only at the age of four Bonnie Parker had done pageants ,she had been very good at her pageants but in public had lied to judges so she sounded better than the other little girls. Also in Bonnie’s school days she had wrote poetry. As Bonnie had gotten older she had fallen in love with a boy named Roy thornton, and on
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Jones, Joe Palmer, Ralph Fults, and Henry Melvin. The first time Cyde went to Bonnie's house he had gotten arrested. Then once Clyde had got in jail and Bonnie had help and plan Clyde's escape out of prison. Bonnie and Clyde were not only kidnappers and murderers but also robbers. The first killing of the Barrow Gang was a deputy in Dallas, Texas. But in all The Barrow Gang had killed 13 people. While the gang was on the run they had robbed the total of 15 banks in all. From 1931 to 1935 the media had gave a lot of attention to Bonnie and Clyde making them famous for their crime. During the 1930’s Bonnie and Clyde were America's most famous outlaws, and still are one of the greatest crime partners in history.
“Clyde might have been a criminal and a killer but he was always close to his

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