Analysis Of Thomas Chatterton Williams 'Black Culture Beyond Hip-Hop Studies'

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In “Colleges Embrace Hip-Hop Studies”, Darrell Dela Rosa argues that hip-hop should be deemed scholarly due to the cultural and historical significance it holds. On the contrary, “Black Culture Beyond Hip-Hop” by Thomas Chatterton Williams comes from the stand point of hip-hop not being worthy of scholar because it is not what defines black culture but has attached itself to black street culture. While each article addresses hip-hop in a different light, both are geared towards how the world views hip-hop. Whereas Dela Rosa remarks that hip-hop is worthy of studying due to its historical value, Williams states that the hip-hop culture is not praiseworthy because of the correlation between it and black street culture. Dela Rosa claims that …show more content…

Williams believes that hip-hop shouldn’t be valued scholarly due to its effects on black society. Hip-Hop is detrimental to black society because it is being associated with lower class behavior. As William states, “hip-hop culture is not black culture, it’s black street culture,” (Williams), he tries to show how the culture of African Americans is not correlated to black street culture. They are both two entirely different subjects but because of society, they are being meshed together, leading to unfavorable outcomes. Poor mannerisms and actions that emerge in black society are due to hip-hop, according to Williams. Hip-hop encourages and glorifies violence, high class living without working to get there, and promiscuity. Hip-hop culture isn’t considered scholarly because it drives people to attain a lifestyle of laziness, not working to attain goals, and demeaning the value of schoolwork. At this time hip-hop is viewed in a negative connotation while other genre of music, like jazz, are seen in a positive …show more content…

While some may see it as a negative influence on society, others believe it is deemed scholarly due to its cultural and historical value. While each argument makes its own points on the manner, in the end, hip-hop is and will always be seen in the public eye due to its popularity. In time we shall see where hip-hop ends up in society. It may be like jazz where it will be seen in a negative manner for years and years but one day may emerge as scholarly. Or, it may never be proven as scholarly due to the negative impact it may have on black street culture. Whereas Dela Rosa remarks that hip-hop is worthy of studying due to its historical value, Williams states that the hip-hop culture is not praiseworthy because of the correlation between it and black street culture. Time will only tell whether or not hip-hop will one day be accepted by

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