Analysis Of Thomas Lux's 'The Voice You Hear When You Read Silently'

1062 Words5 Pages
India Watkins
ENGLISH
Mr. Ivey (8 a.m. Class)
The Voice You Hear When You Read Silently
When you read silently, there is never really silence, there’s always that one voice. Thomas Lux’s, “The Voice You Hear When You Read silently” utters the true meaning of this statement. Lux’s explanation on the voice that you hear when you read silently has its difference from what others might say or explain about this. Rather than just reading in complete silence that voice in your head, which is sometimes your conscious, inner self, and more, is always there inside. “The Voice you hear when you read silently is not silent; it is a speaking-out-loud voice in your head” (Lux 1-2). He explains this as the voice that is always
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On the other hand Thomas Lux also uses this line to bring out to each and every person that the voice that is heard when you read silently always will speak something that is not the same as to how another person might see that word or thing, “It is your voice saying, for example, the word barn that the writer wrote but the barn you say is a barn you know or knew” (Lux 16-20). Using this for example everyone has/have a different mindset, image, and meaning to certain things and words. Thomas Lux added this to help add more about the voice that is heard in everyone’s head. Lux graduated from Emerson College and attended the writing program at University of Iowa for a year before beginning a long teaching career. Thomas Lux has a passion for writing poems and wanted to be a teacher earlier in his career. Thomas Lux has/have a passion for writing poems. With each poem that Thomas Lux has written there has been a meaning or perspective. Thomas Lux uses the silent voice or mental voice to emphasize the importance if the reading. Thomas Lux used techniques such as alliterations,…show more content…
Thomas Lux: A Biography. Thomas Lux: A Biography. 1, Sept. 2010. This essay presents a biography of the poet Thomas Lux. Born in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1956, Lux was raised on a working dairy farm. He graduated from Emerson College and attended the writing program at University of Iowa for a year before beginning a long teaching career. Since publishing his first book of poems Memory's Handgrenade in 1972, Lux has continued to publish widely in full-length volumes of poems, chapbooks, and prestigious journals. Critics have praised the way Lux infuses humor with darkness, evoking a tone of both irony and hope. His volumes of poems, including Half Promised Land (1986), Split Horizon (1994), The Blind Swimmer: Selected Early Poems, 1970-1975 (1996), New and Selected Poems, 1975-1995 (1997), The Street of Clocks (2001), The Cradle Place (2004), and God Particles (2008), have helped to establish Lux as one of the country's most respected living poets. Lux's awards include three grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Guggenheim fellowship, and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for Split Horizon. After teaching at Sarah Lawrence College for 27 years, Lux now teaches at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. (English) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Thomas Lux: A Biography is the property of Great Neck Publishing and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission.

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