Analysis Of Train To Pakistan

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thousands fled from both sides of the border seeking refuge and security. The natives were uprooted and it was certainly a horrible experience for them to give up their belongings and rush to a land which was not theirs. Partition touched the whole country and Singh’s objective in this novel is to see the events from the point of view of the people of Mano Majra, a small village, which is situated at the border between India and Pakistan. Originally it is entitled Mano Majra which suggests static, while the present title, Train to Pakistan, implies change. The novel was published in 1956 less than ten years after the partition.
Train to Pakistan portrays the trauma of Partition that gave birth to two political boundaries—India and Pakistan. On the eve of Partition, thousands fled from both sides of the border seeking refuge and security. The natives were uprooted and it was certainly a horrible experience for them to give up their belongings and rush to a land which was not theirs. Khushwant Singh’s Train to Pakistan illustrates another facet of Partition history—the infamous “death trains”—and the imagined emotions attached to these death trains, which carried refugees across the newly-created borders.
Apart from the murders, rapes, other, more specific kinds of violence had been visited on women. Many were paraded naked in the streets, several had their breasts cut off, their bodies were tattooed with marks of the ‘other’ religion; in a bid to define the so-called ‘purity’
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