The Paleo-Indians

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1.) Paleo Indians The Paleo-Indians were groups of people that traveled to America from Northeastern Asia around 13,000 B.C.E. They traveled in bands (containing fifteen to fifty people) where women cared for the children and prepared the food that the men hunted. At Monte Verde, Chile, the Paleo-Indians had a wide variety of plants and animals to choose from; however, they had a greater interest in large mammals such as: mammoths, caribou, and bison. Upon encountering other groups, the Paleo-Indians shared ideas and traded goods. 2.) Archaic peoples After the Ice Age, new plants and animals, including the Native Americans, were able to flourish in this new environment. The Native Americans in this time era were called Archaic Peoples. Because…show more content…
Because of their ability to produce and distribute surplus crops, the Incas were able to expand their territory from their capital in Cuzco, to most of the Andes. Another factor that helped in expansion was their vast network of roads and bridges. The Incas created a terraced irrigation system that would provide water from the mountains to their crops. The Spanish also wiped out the Incas in the sixteenth century. 5.) Hohokam culture The Hohokam culture originated in southern Arizona at around 300 C.E. The Hohokam peoples built irrigation canals so that they harvest two crops per year. The Hohokam peoples worked together in organized groups to maintain these canals. They lived together in permanent towns which were connected by the canals. In each town lived several hundred residents where they worked, practiced their religion, and created art. 6.) Ancestral Pueblo…show more content…
Adena villages were very small and spread out across a wide area, the population hardly went over four hundred residents. The Adena people built mounds of dirt which contained graves. Based on how rich or poor the people were, depended on whether the dead were cremated, or put in tombs. The Adena culture later turned into a more extensive culture, Hopewell. 9.) Hopewell Hopewell evolved from the Adena culture and expanded the Ohio Valley to the Illinois River Valley in 100 B.C.E. Just like in Adena, the Hopewell culture contained two/three dozen mounds per several square miles. People in the upper class would be buried with many valuables and sacred objects. Through trade, the Hopewell culture influenced many communities as far as New York. Like the people of Adena and Poverty Point, the Hopewell culture did not focus on farming. 10.) Mississippian culture Beginning in C.E. 700, the Mississippian culture was made up of the eastern societies that focused mainly on agriculture. Their production of goods and long-distance trade dominated that of Adena and Hopewell peoples. Mississippian centers relied on plazas to grow, because of the people that they attracted. Beside the plazas would be mounds with either temples on top or houses for the superiors. Religious ceremonies at the temples would focus on the worship of the sun because the sun keeps the land
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