Andrew Carnegie Villain Or Hero

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“Who is the richest American ever?”When asked this question, the name that most often come to mind is Bill Gates but the actual American to become the richest, most famous, influential and the most two-sided businessman at the time: Andrew Carnegie, hero or villain?. In order to answer that question we have to know what the words "hero” and "villain” actually mean. According to Webster Dictionary, a hero is a “person, especially a man admired for courage, nobility, or exploits, especially in war,” and "the central figure in any important event or period, honored for outstanding qualities.” or basically a role model who does good for a cause and has good morals while a villain is described as "someone or something regarded as the cause of …show more content…

He is a fanatical about costs in that when he asked his friend Frank how much money did he make last month and he said he does not know, Carnegie said that he would get out of it if it happened to him. Also, when a new steel competitor called Allegheny Bessemer Steel. Carnegie was worried about his competitor’s production method which is the direct rolling process which would undercut his prices so he sent a notice warning railroads that their methods created defective rails that could cause fatal accidents to raise alarm and after he buried the company, he modified it to use the direct rolling process. According to “Homestead and Its Perilous Trades,” the workers worked 12 hours for $2.25 with cuts of 85 cents with pay ranging from $1.40 to $10 with ⅔ of the workers getting the pay and how the crude molten iron kills workers often. Carnegie wrote to Frick: “My idea….is always to shut down and suffer. Let them decide to go back to work.” Last but not least, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch said how Carnegie confessed he was a coward and lied and ran off to Scotland out of harm’s way to await the issue of the battle he was too weak to share and also did not say anything to stop the bloodshed but only said he had confidence in the managers of the …show more content…

No pangs remain of any wound received in my business career save that of Homestead. It was so unnecessary.” and how he gave his workers mostly $2.25 to $10 with cuts to $1.40 which was still more than in some industries as wages which is more than the workers’ wages in other industries such as textile, iron, paper, etc and was more than enough to support a six-person family shown by Historical Statistics of the United States, Bureau of the Census. Also, he gave away, shown in Andrew Carnegie, over 350 million dollars which was 90% of his wealth. He believed in giving money to the poor shown in his Gospel of Wealth when he said “There are but three modes in which surplus wealth can be disposed of. It can be left to the families of the descendents; or it can be bequeathed for public purposes; or, finally, it can be administered by its possessors during their lives….The first is the most injudicious. Why should men leave great fortunes to their children? If this is done from affection, is it not misguided affection?….As to the second mode, that of leaving wealth at death for public uses, why should a man wait until he is dead before he becomes of much good in the world?....Men who leave vast sums in this way may fairly be thought men who would not have left it at all

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