Andrew Jackson Persuasion

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An opinion of Andrew Jackson from an American Citizen in 1837 Looking back over the two terms Andrew Jackson served as President of the United States from his history making short inauguration speech to his leaving office there are three main issues that stand out from all the rest that define who Andrew Jackson was. Andrew Jackson earned his nickname, Old Hickory, for being a rough and tough man (Roark et al., 2014, pp.283) as he frequently gave the impression that he was strong enough to fight against anyone, as he was known for duel challenges, and felt honor was a man’s leading character, not to mention he was victorious at the Battle of New Orleans. Andrew Jackson appeared tough enough to lead the way for the country and be the champion…show more content…
Jackson forced the five remaining Indian tribes of the East of the Mississippi river, the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole and Choctaw, to the West enabling Indian lands to be sold to settlers and pave the way to the West to settle the land, although he was not exactly in approval of the Western Expansion. The Indians were powerless against this stronger and more powerful version of Andrew Jackson that the Cherokee had fought with in 1788. In a final effort after pleas to Congress with petitions for protection from unfair laws, mainly in Georgia, the Indian Nation cleverly took their case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Although they won their case, the Indian Nation believing that Chief Justice John’s ruling would be observed, was still forced out of their lands. Andrew Jackson’s simply did not acknowledge the court’s decision and proceeded on removing the Indians even at gunpoint. The Indians were not prepared for such a miserable journey and many died from horrible deaths from sickness and the freezing harsh blizzard weather as they walked through the mountain terrain to their destiny in…show more content…
The South was prosperous as they had been purchasing cheap priced goods that were exported that they did not produce but the tariff caused the South to pay double since they now had to pay higher prices on those products and their cotton they sold to Britain had to be priced higher making it harder to sell. The Southern states did not feel this lessened tariff was going to be effective enough and was a failure, mainly in South Carolina, who responded by declaring the right to nullification of the tax. Vice President Calhoun, who Jackson felt a personal dislike for, supported South Carolina’s nullification and Jackson responded with his Old Hickory attitude and threatened that he would use the United States Army to take action against South Carolina. This settled down for a while with the Compromise Tariff if 1833 turning out to be satisfactory by the South and South
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